We visited the cathedral a couple of posts ago, and after climbing down from the bell tower we had coffee and croissants, remember?  Well, as we enjoy our “cafe con leche,” right across the square is Santiago Apóstol Church, more than 100 years older than the cathedral.

IMG_20180131_123251904_HDR.jpg

Inside, though not large, it makes quite an impression.

IMG_20180131_121916149.jpg

 

To the right is this magnificent sculpture.

IMG_20180131_122436712_LL.jpg

 

Just below the sculpture is an Ecce Homo (which I learned to recognize when writing the cathedral post).

IMG_20180131_122559512_LL.jpgIMG_20180131_122547210_LL.jpg

 

Angels light the altar of the church.  These were sculpted by La Roldana, who made the Ecce Homo statue at the cathedral.

 

Here are the transepts, left and right.

 

They are so ornate and detailed that it’s hard to take them in.  It’s better to get up close.

IMG_20180131_122622723_LL.jpg

 

I often show relics from museums in this blog, but this church has relics of another kind, displayed behind glass in the transept carvings.

IMG_20180131_122530013_LL.jpgIMG_20180131_122909175_LL.jpg

 

This is the pulpit…

IMG_20180131_122221283_LL.jpg

 

…with a carving that reminds me of a certain Led Zeppelin song.

IMG_20180131_122202157_LL.jpg

 

Jesus as a toddler.

IMG_20180131_122501520_LL.jpg

 

I have golden memories of my girls as toddlers, but those raising children currently may occasionally find them less than angelic.

My favorite image from this visit is of the Holy Trinity.

IMG_20180131_122123773_LL.jpg

 

I’ve never seen an image like this one.  God is shown in person, and in larger proportion than Jesus, who appears to still be dead.

I guess by now it must seem that there are churches on every block in Spain.  Why are there so many?  I dunno.  There was a time when the USA had a lot of bowling alleys.  Who can explain it?

Lots of tourists in town today, and I hear more German than usual…